Should Federal or State Prisoners with Dementia or Other Chronic and Debilitating Conditions Get a Pass Because They’re Old?

Should Federal or State Prisoners with Dementia or Other Chronic and Debilitating Conditions Get a Pass Because They’re Old?

[When I read this article it reminded me of my times served best working in memory centers, adults with developmental disabilities and I strongly agree with the Osborne Association. Continue to read to learn more…]

https://www.forbes.com/sites/robinseatonjefferson/2018/05/25/new-report-makes-recommendations-for-releasing-caring-for-aging-prisoners/

By 2030, people over 55 will make up a third of the U.S. prison population; and exploding numbers of seniors in prison and rising costs to care for them are putting the country’s criminal justice system “at risk of collapse,” according to the report by the Osborne Association, a policy advocacy and direct-service organization dedicated to transforming the criminal justice system in New York City.

Elizabeth Gaynes  CEO of the Osborne Association

[“Increasing rates of elder incarceration have reached crisis-level and put unsustainable pressure on the justice system as a whole.”]

The crisis, she said, is exacerbated by the fact that prisons were never designed to be geriatric wards for individuals with a whole host of age-related issues— from arthritic knees, to difficulty bathing, to the extensive medical attention required for illnesses like strokes, emphysema, Alzheimer’s and cancer. “Incarcerated individuals experience a mental and physical decline at a much faster rate than people outside of prison. Research shows that 40% of incarcerated older people are diagnosed with cognitive impairment. For some, dementia becomes so pronounced that they cannot even remember why they are incarcerated in the first place.”

https://www.forbes.com/sites/robinseatonjefferson/2018/05/25/new-report-makes-recommendations-for-releasing-caring-for-aging-prisoners/

http://www.osborneny.org/about/

https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers

MN Showdown (1992- 1996) Radio Loop Stunt; 93X versus 93 The Edge…?

MN Showdown (1992- 1996) Radio Loop Stunt; 93X versus 93 The Edge…?

“It’s The End Of The World As We Know It”

KLXK was clearly influenced by another young station, WKLH in Milwaukee, which had recently adopted a similar format. KLXK enjoyed modest success, but rival KQRS-FM had retooled their format to include a large amount of classic rock product, and also had the top-rated morning show in the market.

KLXK eventually decided to attack KQRS from another front. On January 28, 1992, 93.7 flipped to hard rock with the call sign KRXX (“93X”). The owner of rival KQRS-FM, took control of 93X pending purchase (but not KMZZ, which was sold separately later) from Entercom on February 4, 1994. The selling price was $20 million, and then a record for highest amount ever paid for a radio station in the market. The following day, 93X began stunting with a loop “It’s the End of the World as We Know It” by R.E.M. throughout the weekend.

Confused listeners flocked in droves to the KRXX studios in Eagan MN that Saturday to see what was going on. Some listeners thought the DJ’s were being held hostage and reportedly, more than 50 calls regarding KRXX were logged to 911. Finally, on Sunday, February 6, at 8 p.m., 93.7 began simulcasting KQRS’ weekly alternative rock show, “Over the Edge”, leading the way for “93.7 The Edge”, which billed itself as “Minnesota’s New Music Alternative”. In a massively popular stunt to secure 93X listeners, the first song played after the switch was “It’s the End of the World as We Know It” by R.E.M.

The new KEGE-FM call letters were soon registered for the new station. The move to create The Edge was due to the growing popularity of modern rock format nationwide, and to thwart Cargill Communications pending plans to roll out the format on the new Rev 105. The Edge came on the air almost two years after KJJO switched to country music, and it did what KJ104 couldn’t – it became a massive ratings success. At one point, KEGE had the highest overall Arbitron market ratings of any modern rock station in the country.

A station-sponsored annual concert known as the EdgeFest (later 93XFest) debuted soon after, and took place annually in Somerset, Wisconsin. It was so popular that even rival Rev 105 gave away tickets for it (though not mentioning the “Edgefest” name). When KEGE went back to being 93X and the “Edge” name was retired in the Twin Cities, the festival briefly continued as “Edgefest” and was later renamed 93XFest. The annual festival in Somerset continued until 2004, when “93X Riverfest” replaced it.

Following the Telecommunications Act of 1996 that relaxed ownership restrictions, ABC purchased KEGE’s rival, “Rev 105” in March 1997 and immediately began broadcasting hard rock on that station as “X105”. Later that year, on September 18, at 2 p.m., the two stations did a format swap of sorts, with 93.7 returning to active rock and the 93X moniker with new call letters KXXR, while The Edge’s format moved over to the 105 frequencies and rebranded as “Zone 105” (though it would be tweaked to AAA) on September 24 after six days of simulcasting 93X on all four frequencies. On the final day of broadcasting, The Edge played “It’s the End of the World as We Know It” by R.E.M. on a continuous loop.

How Successful Was The Ice Bucket Challenge?

The ALS Phenomenon; The Ice Bucket Challenge went viral on social media during July–August 2014.

The Ice Bucket Challenge, sometimes called the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, was an activity involving the dumping of a bucket of ice and water over a person’s head, either by another person or self-administered, to promote awareness of the disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as motor neurone disease and in the US as Lou Gehrig’s disease) and encourage donations to research.

Within 24 hours of being challenged, participants had to record a video of themselves in continuous footage. First, they were to announce their acceptance of the challenge, followed by pouring ice into a bucket of water. Then, the bucket was to be lifted and poured over the participant’s head. Then the participant could nominate a minimum of three other people to participate in the challenge.

Within weeks of the challenge going viral, The New York Times reported that the ALS Association had received $41.8 million in donations from more than 739,000 new donors from July 29 until August 21, more than double the $19.4 million the association received during the year that ended January 31, 2013.

On August 29, the ALS Association announced that their total donations since July 29 had exceeded $100 million.The ALS Association is just one of several ALS-related charities that have benefited from the challenge. However, it was reported that the 2015 challenge had raised $500,000 as compared with the $115 million raised by the 2014 challenge. The final figure was reported by the ALS Association in mid-October as being $1,000,000, with a survey by health analysts Treato showing that only 14% of donors from 2014 donated again in 2015

In July 2015, it was reported on the ALS Association’s summary of how the funds raised through the Ice Bucket Challenge were distributed. By percentage, 67% of all funds (about $77 million) went to research, 20% to patient and community services, 9% to public and professional.

MB

Above the Influence

This is truly an amazing site for teens to have a voice. This site has my support, I’d give them a 5 star rating.

 

Above the Influence

http://abovetheinfluence.com/friends-peers/

[There might come a point when you ask yourself, who am I really? Am I being real? Am I still the kid my parents think I am? And more importantly, who do I want to be?

The truth is, you’re a lot of things to a lot of people – you’re interesting like that. You can be one thing online and still be kind of different in person. You can be someone to look up to, and know what it feels like to get rejected. You can be righteous in your decisions and still slip up and make mistakes.

But, with so many versions of yourself, it’s easy to forget the one thing that keeps you real – the pure-grade, original first edition of yourself.

The point is, when you reach the moment where you have to ask yourself, who am I really? Press pause. Hit reset. And remember, you’re Above the Influence.]

http://abovetheinfluence.com/friends-peers/